NAME: Goldbelt Spring
CLIMATE: Hot summer, cool winter
COMMENTS: East/south from Teakettle Junction in Death Valley NP, thru Hidden Valley. Or east on Hunter Mountain Road, likely closed by snow in winter and late spring
REMAINS: Dumptruck, dugout, building remains
The famous Shorty Harris lead the first rush into the Goldbelt Mining District after he discovered gold a few miles south of the area's namesake, Goldbelt Spring. There was talk of building a town site but, the ore didn't amount to much so, the talk fizzled. Harris also discovered tungsten here in 1915. In the 1940's, talc was discovered and mined in various locations. Although no large talc deposits were ever discovered here. There are only flattened buildings now left when only a few years ago there were three 50s era shacks, a dugout and an outhouse. The nearby Calmet Mine has an abandoned ore chute. The spring is marked by a dumptruck, resting forever at this site. As this is the only reliable spring in the area, it was used by the Tuhu band of Western Shoshoni indians, and later by miners (mostly talc and chrysotile asbestos) as a base camp. Before they were removed by the Park Service, non-indigenous feral burros frequented the site, evidenced by numerous skulls and bones that could once be found nearby. None of the local mines was particularly productive and none were major operations. Geologically, chrysotile occurs just north of Goldbelt on the east side of Ulida Flat in a zone of serpentinized dolomite which was altered in contact with quartz monzonite, probably of the Hunter Mountain Pluton. Submitted by: Bill Cook

Goldbelt dwelling, outhouse and dugout
Courtesy Bill Cook

Framed at Goldbelt
Courtesy Bill Cook

Downtown Goldbelt Spring
Courtesy Bill Cook

Goldbelt Spring
Courtesy Bill Cook

Dumptruck at Goldbelt Spring
Courtesy Bill Cook

Shingled outhouse Goldbelt Spring
Courtesy Bill Cook

View to downtown from the spring
Courtesy Bill Cook

Goldbelt leaning. It was gone by our next visit
Courtesy Bill Cook