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ACTIVITY: Dade Battlefield State Historic Site
LOCATION:Bushnell, Florida

FEE: None
OPEN DATES:
8:00 AM to Sunset. Museum 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
COMENTS: "Have a good heart; our difficulties and dangers are over now, and as soon as we arrive at Fort King you'll have three days rest and keep Christmas gaily." Maj. Francis L. Dade, spoke these words of encouragement to 107 cold and tired soldiers here in a pine forest the morning of Dec. 28, 1835. He and his men had only moments to live. In less than eight hours, not a man would be left standing in the column of sky-blue uniforms and black forage caps that stretched behind him. The Second Seminole War was about to begin

ACTIVITY: Gamble Plantation State Historic Site
LOCATION:Ellenton, Florida

FEE: 3.00 adult, 1.50 ages 6 - 12, children 6 and under free.
OPEN DATES:
Park - 8:00 - Sunset, Mansion - Thursday through Monday w/tours at 9:30 AM 10:30 AM and 1,2,3,& 4 PM
COMENTS: The mansion was the home of Major Robert Gamble and the headquarters of an extensive sugar plantation of over 3,500 acres. In May of 1865, after the fall of the Confederacy, Confederate Secretary of State Judah P. Benjamin took refuge in the house until his safe passage to England could be secured. In 1925, the mansion and 16 acres were saved by the United Daughters of the Confederacy and donated to the state. Today, it is furnished in the style of a successful mid-19th century plantation. A guided tour through the mansion depicts a time and way of life that were very much a part of Florida's unique history.

ACTIVITY: Bulow Plantation Ruins State Historic Sitee
LOCTION:Bunnell, Florida

FEE: 2.00 per vehicle
OPEN DATES:
9 AM to 5 PM
COMENTS: Bulow's Sugar Mill, constructed of local "coquina" rock was the largest mill in East Florida. At the boat slips, flatboats were loaded with barrels of raw sugar and molasses and floated down Bulow Creek to be shipped north. This frontier industry came to an abrupt end at the outbreak of the Second Seminole War. In January 1836 a band of Seminole Indians, resisting removal to the West, looted and burned the plantation. It never recovered. Today the walls and chimneys of the sugar mill remain standing.

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